University Press Week Blog Tour concludes

It’s University Press Week! All week long university presses will be participating in the UP Week Blog Tour, where presses will be blogging each day about a different theme that relates to scholarly publishing.

 up-week

November 14 – Subject Area Spotlight: Follow Friday

University of Illinois Press A post discussing the emerging topics and authors in our Geopolitics of Information series.

University of Minnesota Press John Hartigan, participant in our new Forerunners (short-form publishing) series, is writing a post about the ways in which he uses social media to enhance scholarly connections and establish social-media conversations with regard to his research.

University of Nebraska Press How should UPs be adding to the conversation on social media and who is doing it right? UNP marketing takes a look at the potential social media has for scholarly publishing.

NYU Press A post on our forthcoming website for our book, Keywords for American Cultural Studies (Second Edition).

Island Press A post about what our editors are paying attention to and why those scholars/fields are important.

Columbia University Press Every Friday, the Columbia University Press blog runs a post called the University Press Roundup in which we highlight posts from around the academic publishing blogosphere. Our Blog Tour post will explain how and why we have made this commitment to a blog series that rarely features our own titles. We will discuss how university press blogs generate publicity for individual titles, but also provide a much-needed environment where scholarship can be presented for a general readership.

 

University Press Week continues!

It’s University Press Week! All week long university presses will be participating in the UP Week Blog Tour, where presses will be blogging each day about a different theme that relates to scholarly publishing.

 up-week

November 12 – Subject Area Spotlight: University Presses in Popular Culture

University of Pennsylvania Press University Presses often publish works that cater to very specific niches. But they also publish books that reach a broader, general audiences.

Princeton University Press An entry on The Imitation Game and our experience on the movie-tie-in edition of Alan Turing: The Enigma.

University of Kentucky Press Highlighting our forthcoming biography on Dalton Trumbo, a Blacklisted Hollywood screen writer of films such as Spartacus and Roman Holiday and a member of the Hollywood Ten. He opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee. Bryan Cranston recently debuted the “Cranstache” at the Emmy’s, grown in preparation to portray Trumbo in an upcoming biopic directed by Jay Roach.

Georgetown University Press A look at recent TV shows on spying (Turn, Sleepy Hollow, The Assets) and how our books give the historical background to the storyline.

University of Mississippi Press We will be highlighting our book Walt Before Mickey which has been adapted into a movie set to open Thanksgiving Weekend.

University of Wisconsin Press  RIPPED FROM THE HEADLINES. We will highlight books that we’ve published just as an issue became important news, whether the issue was gays in the military, militarized police, torture, or immigration, and hopefully some lighter topics too!

Follow Temple University Press on twitter @templeunivpress and #upweek

Celebrating University Press Week with UP Images

It’s University Press Week! All week long university presses will be participating in the UP Week Blog Tour, where presses will be blogging each day about a different theme that relates to scholarly publishing.

up-week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 11 – Subject Area Spotlight: University Presses in Pictures

Indiana University Press A fun look at the history of our press as we celebrate our 65th anniversary next year.

Stanford University Press Old black and white photos of the press and its printing facilities as they existed in the 1950s and 1960s that really highlight the artistry and crafstmanship that goes into print publishing.

Fordham University Press A photo collage featuring FUP events and memorable moments over the years.

John Hopkins University Press  A Q& A with JHUP Art Director Martha Sewell and a short film of author and marine illustrator Val Kells in her studio.

University Press of Florida A look at UPF in pictures through the years.

 

And speaking of pictures, here’s a “shelfie” from Temple University Press AMAShelfie2

Celebrating University Press Week

It’s University Press Week! All week long university presses will be participating in the UP Week Blog Tour, where presses will be blogging each day about a different theme that relates to scholarly publishing.

http://www.upress.virginia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/up-week.gif

November 10 – Subject Area Spotlight: Collaboration
University Press of Colorado will expand on our collaboration with the Veterinary Information Network on a recent textbook, Basic Veterinary Immunology.
University of Georgia Press will expand on the New Georgia Encyclopedia (NGE) partnership, which includes the Georgia Humanities Council, UGA libraries, GALILEO, and the Press. The NGE is the state’s award-winning, on-line only, multi-media reference work on the people, places, events, and institutions of Georgia.
Duke University Press Author Eben Kirksey on collaboration at the intersection of anthropology and biology, including his own recent collection, “The Multispecies Salon.”
University of California Press Authors Dr. Paul Farmer and Dr. Jim Yong Kim discuss the collaborative work they are doing to fight the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.
University of Virginia Press An account of a collaboration between the Press and the Presidential Recordings Project at the Miller Center to create ‘Chasing Shadows,’ a book on the origins of Watergate, with a special ebook and web site allowing readers to listen to the actual Oval Office conversations.
McGill-Queen’s University Press Elaborates on the title submitted for the online gallery: Landscape Architecture in Canada – a major national project with support from scholars across the country and published simultaneously in French and English by two University Presses. Followed by cross-Canada book tour, “CONVERSATIONS”, in partnership with the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects.
Texas A&M University Press Focusing on a new consumer advocacy series launched earlier this year with the Texas A&M School of Public Health, whose mission is to improve the health of communities through education, research, service, outreach, and creative partnerships. Prepare to Defend Yourself . . . How to Navigate the Healthcare System and Escape with Your Life falls in line with the School of Public Health’s mission, as well as with its involvement in the Texas A&M One Health Initiative, a collaborative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain sustainable optimal health for the ecosystem.
Project MUSE/John Hopkins University Press Project MUSE is the poster child for collaboration in the university press world, resulting from collaboration between a university press and university library. We’ll ruminate on collaboration in the university press world in general, drawing on specific instances of collaboration among university presses from MUSE’s history. MUSE Commons is a separate blog from that of our parent institution, JHUP.
Yale University Press Mark Polizzotti, director of the publications program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, will contribute a guest post to our ‘Museum Quality Books’ series. The series consists of guest posts from the knowledgeable, erudite, witty, insightful, and altogether delightful directors of publishing at the museums and galleries with whom we collaborate on books.
University Press of Chicago A post on the first year of the Turabian Teacher Collaborative, featuring guest content from one of the University of Iowa professors helming the endeavor; see this Q & A for additional info/general sensibility.

Where to see Temple University Press authors

This week, we encourage you to come out and see Temple University Press authors Ray Didinger, (The New Eagles Encyclopedia) and Dan Rottenberg (The Outsider) at their various Philadelphia area events.

Ray Didinger, author of The New Eagles Encyclopedia will be speakingThe New Eagles Encyclopedia_sm at:

  • The Union League 140 S. Broad Street in Philadelphia, on September 30, at 6:00 pm. (Appropriate attire required)
  • Barnes & Noble, 200 West Route 70 in Marlton, NJ on November 22, at 3:00 pm, and on December 21, at 3:00 pm.

Dan Rottenberg, author of The Outsider, about Albert M. Greenfield and the Fall of the Protestant Establishment, will be speaking at:

The Outsider_sm

  • The Gershman Y, 401 S. Broad Street in Philadelphia, PA, on September 21, at 11:00 am (Brunch; ticket required).
  • Union League 140 S. Broad Street in Philadelphia, on October 8, at 6:00 pm. (Appropriate attire required)

Is gender stifling our scientific imaginations?

This week, we showcase Conceiving Masculinity author Liberty Walther Barnes’ recent TEDx talk at Cambridge University. 

Is Gender a Liquid or a Solid?

In sociology we like to say that gender is “flexible and fluid,” because gender norms change over time and across cultures.  Men and women can choose to enact, perform, and express masculinity and femininity in a variety of ways regardless of their sex chromosomes or anatomy.  Just as liquids take the shape of their containers, we can shape our gender identities to fit us.

While personal gender identities and expressions are malleable, the gender system that structures our social world has proven able to withstand some pretty impressive seismic shifts. As sociologists Cecilia Ridgeway and Shelley Correll explain, the gender system is a large apparatus that determines who gets access to resources and opportunities. The gender system – invisible yet ubiquitous – is solidly grounded in very traditional gender beliefs, which prevent the system from being toppled. Because gender beliefs are pervasive and durable, we might say gender is a solid.

Conceiving MasculinityMost of us agree that gender stereotypes are silly. We laugh when people break the “rules” of gender in TV sit-coms and films. In our everyday lives we feel free to break the rules of gender to accommodate our personal preferences and life goals. In other words, we appreciate the fluidity of gender.

While researching male infertility for my book, Conceiving Masculinity, I discovered that gender is a more powerful social category than most of us realize. Just how solid is gender? As I explain in my TEDx talk, when gender and science come crashing together, something’s gotta give. And it’s not gender.

Gender, it turns out, is a stronger, more solid, and more powerful social category than science. Whodathunkit? Science is rigorous and robust, defined by hard facts and well researched, evidence-based truths, right? If we had to categorize science as a liquid or a solid, we would certainly call it a solid.

However, gender beliefs shape science. How we think about men and women, masculinity and femininity, channels the direction of scientific thought and shapes medical practices. Sometimes society has a hard time accepting scientific truths when they are glaring us in the face, because we cling to gender ideology. Rather than reconsider our gender beliefs, we bend science to accommodate our timeworn gender beliefs.

Day 4 of University Press Week – The Importance of Regional Publishing

upweek-logo-2013_iik

It’s University Press Week! All week long university presses will be participating in the UP Week Blog Tour, where presses will be blogging each day about a different theme that relates to scholarly publishing. For the full Blog Tour schedule, click here.

November 14 – Subject Area Spotlight: The Importance of Regional Publishing

Syracuse University Press:  Regional author, Chuck D’Imperio will discuss the roots of regional writing in many of the “classics.” From oral testimonies to local guidebooks, these stories contribute to the culture and history of the region.

Fordham University Press: Fredric Nachbaur, Press Director, writes about establishing the Empires State Editions imprint to better brand and market the regional books, reflect the mission of the university, and co-publish books with local institutions.

University of North Carolina Press:  UNC Press editorial director Mark Simpson-Vos highlights the special value of regional university press publishing at a time when the scale for so much of what we do emphasizes the global.

University Press of Mississippi: UPM Marketing Manager and author of two books, Steve Yates, gives his thoughts on the scale of regional publishing and shares the sage advice of businessmen.

University of Nebraska Press: UNP’s Editor-in-Chief Derek Krissoff defines the meaning of place in University Press publishing.

University of Alabama Press: JD Wilson presents a brief overview of the economic niche regional university presses occupy between mass market trade publishing and non-scholarly regional and local publishing.

University Press of Kentucky: Regional editor, Ashley Runyon, writes on her unique editorial perspective as a born-and-bred Kentuckian as well as preserving Kentucky’s cultural heritage. We’ll also be talking about some of the fun things that make KY (and KY books) unique.

Louisiana State University Press: Discussing the challenge of capturing an authentic representation of Louisiana’s culture, especially when it is an outstider looking in, as many authors (scholars or not) are, Erin Rolfs explains how it takes more than just a well-written, thoroughly researched book to succeed in depicting the nuances of Louisiana’s food, music, and art. It also requires a relationship of respect and acceptance between subject and author. She talks about LSU Press titles that have successfully shared and deepen an understanding of a regional cultural asset through collaboration with those most closely affliliated with the subject.

Oregon State University Press: Mary Elizabeth Braun provides an overview of regional publishing with specifics from the Oregon State University Press list.


Follow the University Press Week blog tour to learn about the importance of university presses. For a complete list of University Press Week events, visit universitypressweek.org

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 78 other followers

%d bloggers like this: