University Press Week Blog Tour: Science

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Science

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Johns Hopkins University Press @JHUPress

To Be Determined

Princeton University Press @PrincetonUPress

Our director Christie Henry will be writing about the evolution of science publishing at university presses, with a focus on how the evolution and long-term sustainability of these programs depend on the ability to create equitable and inclusive populations of authors.

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

We’ll post about Finding Einstein’s Brain by Frederick Lepore, MD.

University Press of Colorado @UPColorado

Imagination requires hope: at once a mode of survival and a form of resistance. A post from UPC author Char Miller.

Columbia University Press @ColumbiaUP

Our new acquisitions editor in the sciences, Miranda Martin, will write a guest blog post about why it’s important for University Presses to publish in the sciences and what her vision is for a list moving forward.

University Press of Toronto @utpress

We reach back to the archives of The Heritage Project at UTP to highlight some key titles from our backlist on the history of science.

University of Georgia Press @ugapress

The post will be of the latest episode of our podcast and it will feature a talk William Bryan gave recently at the Decatur Book Festival for his book The Price of Permanence: Nature and Business in the New South. Bryan’s book is in our Environmental History and the American South series and is about the efforts business leaders in the post-civil war south took to promote environmental stewardship through something they called “permanence,” which is a sort of precursor to what we think of as sustainability.

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University Press Week Blog Tour: History

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is History

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Wilfrid Laurier University Press @wlupress

Nil Santiáñez, author of the recently-published Wittgenstein’s Ethics and Modern Warfare, explores how the Great War impacted Wittgenstein’s philosophy. The post celebrates the centenary of the Armistice of 1918 and focuses on the book’s main topics.

University of California Press, @ucpress

The Western Woman Voter: The Women’s Suffrage Movement, Through the Perspective of the West – an excerpt taken from ‘Shaped by the West, Volume 2: A History of North America from 1850‘ by William Deverell & Anne F. Hyde

University of Nebraska Press, @univnebpress

Jon K. Lauck, adjunct professor of history and political science at the University of South Dakota and the author of numerous books, will discuss the importance of Midwestern history.

University of Alabama Press @univofALpress

A roundup of new and forthcoming history books celebrating Alabama’s bicentennial in 2019 #AL200

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

A history/memoir by acclaimed cultural historian H. Bruce Franklin titled Crash Course: From the Good War to the Forever War. We’ll focus on his book.

University of Rochester Press @boydellbrewer

An interview with the author of our new book An Architecture of Education: African American Women Design the New South, which uncovers the role of African American women in the design and construction of schools in the post-Reconstruction South.

Beacon Press @beaconpressbks

A broad look at our ReVisioning Amerian History and ReVisioning American History for Young Readers Series.

University Press of Kansas  @Kansas_Press 

Will discuss (and celebrate!) the passion of military history readers by interviewing authors, critics and customers.

Harvard University Press  @Harvard_Press

Executive Editor Lindsay Waters looks back on HUP’s hisory of pubishing Bruno Latour.

University of Georgia Press @UGAPress

This post will be a spotlight on one of our newest series, Gender and Slavery, and its inaugural book, Sexuality and Slavery: Reclaiming Intimate Histories in the Americas. The series seeks to shed light on the gendered experience of enslavement including and beyond that of the United States. The book takes on a new approach of sexuality, including discussions of sexuality as a means of resistance, that can help inform our present day.

University of Toronto Press @utpress

Editor Stephen Shapiro reflects on the vast range and the staying power of UTP’s publishing program in history.

MIT Press @mitpress

We have a Q&A with our longtime editor Roger Conover (who is retiring next year) and one of his authors Craig Dworkin, about his history at the MIT Press.

University Press Week Blog Tour: “The Neighborhood” and Finding Diamonds in Our Own Backyard

Temple University founder, Russell H. Conwell’s speech, Acres of Diamondsoffers a multitude of lessons about the rewards of work, education, and finding the riches of life in one’s own back yard.

At Temple University Press, our books that are connected to the university in some way represent the riches in our back yard. Here is a sampling of our favorite titles about Temple, by Temple professors, or by Temple graduates.

 

About Temple University

Color Me…Cherry & White. The brainchild of Press Marketing Director Ann-Marie Anderson, Temple University’s first adult coloring book features more than twenty iconic Temple University landmarks taken by the University Photography Department and crafted into pages for amateur artists to beautify. The designs stoke memories and provide stress relief as artists create their own colorful impressions of the campus.

Temple University, 125 Years of Service to Philadelphia, the Nation, and the WorldJames Hilty and Matthew Hanson. The first full history of Temple University, lovingly written and beautifully designed, this book provides a rich chronicle from founder Russell Conwell’s vision to democratize, diversify, and broaden the reach of higher education.

The Education of a University Presidentby Marvin Wachman. Marvin Wachman’s parents were Russian Jewish immigrants with little formal education. Yet they instilled in their son the values of education, self-improvement, and perseverance. Because of Wachman’s beliefs in human progress, he learned not only how to survive in hard times, but how to flourish.  The Education of a University President recalls Wachman’s distinguished career in education and his steadfast dedication to liberal values.

By Temple University Professors

The Magic of Children’s Gardens, by Lolly Tai, Professor of Landscape Architecture at Temple University.  In The Magic of Children’s Gardens, landscape architect Lolly Tai provides the primary goals, concepts, and key considerations for designing outdoor spaces that are attractive and suitable for children, especially in urban environments. Tai presents inspiring ideas for creating children’s green spaces by examining nineteen outstanding case studies, including the Chicago Botanic Garden, Winterthur, and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Dancing the Fairy Tale, by Laura Katz Rizzo, Program Director of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Program in Dance and an Assistant Professor of Dance at Temple University. Using extensive archival research, dance analysis, and American feminist theory,Dancing the Fairy Tale places women at the center of a historical narrative to reveal how the production and performance of The Sleeping Beauty in the years between 1937 and 2002 made significant contributions to the development and establishment of an American classical ballet.

Philadelphia Maestros, by Phyllis Rodriguez-Peralta, Emeritus Professor of  Spanish and Portuguese at Temple University. A lifelong fan and scholar of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Phyllis Rodriguez-Peralta paints intimate portraits of conductors Eugene Ormandy, Riccardo Muti, and Wolfgang Sawallisch, using archival material and interviews. She recounts Eugene Ormandy’s performance as a last-minute substitute for guest conductor Arturo Toscanini; Riccardo Muti’s magnetic presence and international fame; and the role of Wolfgang Sawallisch in moving the Orchestra to its grand new hall at the Kimmel Center.

By Temple University Graduates

The Eagles Encyclopedia: Champions Edition, by Ray Didinger.  In this Champions Edition of The Eagles Encyclopedia, Didinger recounts the team’s remarkable, against-all-odds season that culminated in Super Bowl LII where they upset the New England Patriots. He updates his best-selling book The Eagles Encyclopedia with the departure of Coach Chip Kelly and the dawn of the Doug Pederson era. He provides a new chapter on the 2017–18 season and postseason. And he includes dozens of new player, coach, and front-office profiles as well as updates on 2018 Hall of Fame inductees Brian Dawkins and Terrell Owens.

My Soul’s Been Psychedelicized, by Larry Magid. In My Soul’s Been Psychedelicized, Magid presents a spectacular photographic history of the bands and solo acts that have performed at the Electric Factory and at other venues in Factory-produced concerts over the past four decades. The book includes concert posters, photographs, and promotional items featuring both rising stars and established performers, such as Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Bette Midler, Elvis Presley, Tina Turner, Pearl Jam, and many, many more.

Not from Here, Not from There, by Nelson Diaz. In his inspiring autobiography, Not from Here, Not from There, Judge Nelson Díaz tells the story of his struggles and triumphs as his perspective widened from the New York streets and law school classrooms to the halls of power in Philadelphia and Washington, DC. Whether as a leader in economic development, a pioneer in court reform, or a champion of fair housing, Díaz has never stopped advocating for others. Díaz was happy to be the first Latino to “do something,” but he never wanted to be the last. This story of an outsider who worked his way to the inside offers powerful lessons on finding a place in the world by creating spaces where everyone is welcome.

University Press Week Blog Tour: Politics

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Politicsbanner.upweek2018

University of Chicago Press @UChicagoPress
The book world is groaning under the weight of books about politics. Yet most of them are just dressed up opinion. What university press books on politics have to offer is much better: data and serious analysis. And we have an incredible group of recent books that, taken together, offer far more insight into what’s going on with American politics than a thousand Bob Woodward or Newt Gingrich books could ever supply.

Georgetown University Press @GUPress

A Pocket Guide to the U.S. Constitution.

Teachers College Press @TCPress

A reading list on education policy or a listicle from an author on the topic.

University of Wisconsin Press @uwiscpress

To Be Determined

University of Virginia Press @uvapress

We are publishing an updated edition of our Trump book in time for second anniversary of inauguration. We will pull something from that book for a post and tie it into the just-decided midterms.

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

We plan to dedicate a post on three recent politics books we’ve published: The Politics of Fame by Eric Burns and the reissues of classics Democracy Ancient and Modern by M.I. Finley and Echoes of the Marseillaise by Eric Hobsbawn.

University of British Columbia Press @UBCPress 

A feature on our new Women’s Suffrage and the Struggle for Democracy series.

Louisiana State University Press @lsupress

I’m going to talk about our new list dealing with contemporary social justice issues, pegged to Jim Crow’s Last Stand and the recent state vote to ban non-unanimous criminal jury verdicts.

University Press of Kansas @Kansas_Press  

Will post interview with Dick Simpson and Betty O’Shaughnessy, authors of Winning Elections in the 21st Century.

 

 

University Press Week Blog Tour: Arts and Culture

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Arts and Culture

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MIT University Press @mitpress
Is planning a Q&A with our longtime editor Roger Conover (who is retiring next year) and one of his authors Slavoj Žižek , a philosopher and cultural critic, about his career here at the Press.

Athabasca University Press  @au_press
Discusses Frankenstein’s influence on Canadian pop culture with a focus on music. Naturally, the author had to create a mix of all the songs mentioned in the book and so we will be discussing how university presses can quite literally #TurnItUp.

Rutgers University Press @RutgersUPress
Dedicates a post to our new book Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts by Judith Brodsky and Ferris Olin

Yale University Press @yaleARTBooks
Based on the book Essential Modernism, edited by Dominic Bradbury, we’ll have a post by Dominic about how immigrants enrich a country’s art and architecture (discusses a number of artists and architects who arrived in the US at midcentury).

Duke University Press @DukePress
Features some recent collaborations with museums, sharing why these collaborations work for both of us.

University of Minnesota Press @UMinnPress
Adrienne Kennedy will be inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame on Nov. 12th. We’ll run an excerpt from The Adrienne Kennedy Reader.

University of Toronto Press @utpress
Social media specialist Tanya Rohrmoser discusses how social media can be an effective vehicle for communicating research in the arts and humanities

The Working People of Philadelphia, Then and Now

This week in North Philly Notes, we highlight a program entitled, “The Working People of  Philadelphia, Then and Now,” which honors a reissue of Bruce Laurie’s classic labor history,  Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850.

The program is one in a series planned in conjunction with the reissuing of 30 out-of-print Temple University Press Labor Studies and Work titles in open access format.

Thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Press, in collaboration with Temple University Libraries, will reissue 30 outstanding labor studies books in PDF, EPUB, and MOBI formats and make them freely available online. Chosen by an advisory board of scholars, labor studies experts, publishers, and librarians, each book contains a new foreword by a prominent scholar, reflecting on the content and placing it in historical context.

VannemanLast week, Matt Wray penned an essay for Public Books on  The American Perception of Classby Reeve Vanneman and Lynn Weber Cannon.

He writes, “… the 1987 publication of The American Perception of Class came as something of a shock. Many in the social sciences, particularly those affiliated with the New Left, seemed not to know what to make of the renegade ideas put forth by Vanneman and Cannon, whose central claim was simple and elegant: one should not mistake the absence of class conflict for absence of class consciousness.”

 

The Working People of Philadelphia, Then and Now

On November 7, at 6:00 pm at the Ethical Society, 1906 Rittenhouse Sq. in Philadelphia, Temple Libraries and Temple University Press are presenting a panel entitled, “The Working People of Philadelphia, Then and Now.”

Laurie_Cover_SM.jpgIn 1980, historian Bruce Laurie published The Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850. The book has now been reissued and is freely available online thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. This title is part of a larger collection of open access books on Labor Studies and Work published by Temple University Press.

In celebration of its return, please join us for a conversation with historians and Philadelphia natives Francis Ryan and Sharon McConnell-Siddorick. They will discuss questions such as: what was it like to be a worker in Philadelphia in the nineteenth century? How was the Philadelphia working class constituted by race, ethnicity, gender, and occupation? What were some of the major problems, hopes, and aspirations that workers shared? What were the cultures, organizations, and institutions that workers created? In what ways have things changed for the better for Philadelphia workers in 2018, and in what ways are they still struggling?”

Registration is requested https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-working-people-of-philadelphia-then-and-now-tickets-50361771414

About the panelists for The Working People of Philadelphia, Then and Now.

Speakers:

Francis Ryan is graduate program director at Rutgers University’s Masters in Labor and Employment Relations program in New Brunswick, New Jersey. His book AFSCME’s Philadelphia Story: Municipal Workers and Urban Power in the Twentieth Century was published by Temple University Press in 2011. He is the editor of The Memoirs of Wendell W. Young III: A Life in Philadelphia Labor and Politics, forthcoming from Temple University Press.

Sharon McConnell-Sidorick is an independent historian and author. She attended the University of Pennsylvania on a Bread Upon the Waters Scholarship for returning women and graduated with a degree in Anthropology. She received her Ph.D. in History from Temple University. She is the author of Silk Stockings and Socialism: Philadelphia’s Radical Hosiery Workers from the Jazz-Age to the New Deal (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), and has written for Jacobin, H-Net and Pennsylvania History. She wrote the forward for the new edition of Bruce Laurie’s The Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850, published by Temple University Press, 2018.

Moderator:

Cynthia Little began her involvement with public history in the 1970s when she was a doctoral student in history at Temple University. She has worked at the Philadelphia Area Cultural Consortium, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and most recently at the Philadelphia History Museum. She has consulted on public history initiatives including for the local tourism industry and the City of Philadelphia. Many of the projects she created have highlighted labor history.

About The National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov

The Myth of Sexual Violence as Only a Crime Against Women

This week in North Philly Notes, we re-post Sex and the Founding Fathers author Thomas Foster’s recent article about sexual violence that appeared October 24 in The A-Line.

By Thomas A. Foster

In our national discussions about sexual assault and sexism that swirled around the Brett Kavanaugh hearing, we veered toward the historical view of sexual assault as a gendered crime. Men played a variety of roles in this national drama—as perpetrators of sexual violence, as raging patriarchs who have been angered by the audacity of women to accuse men of sexual violations, and as pro-feminist allies—but they did not figure prominently as survivors of sexual assault or harassment.

Indeed, if men figured as victims at all in our national discussions, it was primarily as targets of lying women, as victims of a “vast conspiracy,” as Brett Kavanaugh phrased it in his opening statement before the Senate Judicial Committee. Or, as President Trump put it: “It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of.”

As an historian of sexuality in early America, I cannot hear such assertions without being reminded that the notion that every man should be concerned about the power of women’s false accusations of sexual violence is a very old one. It has always relied on misogyny and an inversion of the realities of our courts and culture—a paranoid, sexist fantasy that places powerful men in positions of vulnerability and vulnerable women in positions of supposed authority.

The book Look e’re you Leap; or, A History of Lewd Women (Boston, 1762), for example, warned men by deploying tales of rejected women who used false accusations of rape and seduction to have their revenge. Newspapers in eighteenth-century America routinely included similar fictional tales and just as many stories of trials and false accusations of rape to extort money. One problem with this fearmongering, as Tyler Kingkade points out, is that men are actually more likely to be victims of sexual assault than of false rape accusations brought by women.

Senator Feinstein prefaced her hearing remarks with the statistic that 1 in 6 men have been victims of sexual assault. Even with significant underreporting, 1 in 5 sexual harassment charges filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission come from men. Other figures confirm sexual violence against men as a significant problem. The Department of Defense reported that of nearly 20,000 reports of sexual violence in 2014, for example, roughly half were from men. Sometimes recognizing the existence of an issue does not mean that we take it seriously. Just as with comments that dismissed Kavanaugh’s alleged assault, sexual violence against incarcerated men is an open secret. All too often, it is treated as a source of humor.

Part of the reason that men have not been largely recognized as victims of sexual violence is that our nation has yet to move beyond the gendered definition of sexual assault established by previous generations. In colonial America, rape was explicitly a gendered crime and it remained defined as a crime against women for centuries. It was often also seen as a crime against the victim’s male guardian, a violation of one man’s patriarchal authority of a female dependent. It was only in the 1970s that states began revising sexual assault laws to include male victims. Only in 2012 did the FBI move away from its definition of rape as a crime against a “female,” a definition that had been in use since 1930 when it began tracking such crimes. The FBI definition, however, still focuses on “penetration” and excludes men who are forced or coerced to penetrate. When a CDC study in 2012 included men who were forced or coerced to penetrate in its study of intimate partner violence, it found that men and women reported relatively equal rates of non-consensual sex. The media reporting on the study, however, reverted to the soundbite that women were “disproportionately affected by sexual violence.”

The women’s liberation movement was effective at helping us recognize that power is at the center of sexual assault, instead of lust, as had been the previous interpretation. Feminism provides the tools for understanding sexual violence against men, even if popular culture has still largely defined sexual assault as a crime against women. Including men in a broader discourse about sexual violence, one that still takes into account gender, forces us to think more about root causes of sexual exploitation, rather than letting expressions of it define the problem in today’s society. One danger of defining sexual violence as a gendered crime is that vast portions of the country will reduce some of what is discussed to boorish behavior rather than expressions of abuse.

A young man who commits the kind of sexual assault that Brett Kavanaugh was accused of, is not only a man who does not respect women; he is a person who abuses power and authority for personal satisfaction and gain. The Kavanaugh hearing has shown us many things about ourselves, including that we have progressed very little in our understanding of root causes of sexual assault, and, I fear, therefore, even less in our ability to prevent it.

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