Meet Temple University Press’s new acquiring editor, Sarah Munroe!

This week in North Philly Notes, a Q&A with our new acquiring editor, Sarah Munroe. 

Sarah Munroe joined Temple University Press’s editorial team this week. She will be acquiring titles in Asian American studies, gender and sexuality studies, disability studies, literary studies, as well as regional interest. She comes to the Press after experience at West Virginia University Press and the Pew Charitable Trusts. She has an MFA in creative writing with a focus in poetry.

SarahMunroe

We asked her about her book and reading habits to get to know her better.

What book(s) are you currently reading?
Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (short stories)
The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh (novel)
Indecency by Justin Phillip Reed (poetry)

What’s the last great book you read?
Toddler-Hunting and Other Stories by Taeko Kono – It’s such a deliciously sinister title! The stories were written in the 1960s and set in mid-twentieth century Japan. The restraint and orderliness of the language, setting, and scenarios contrasts surprisingly with the proclivities and obsessions of the characters, yet I found I wanted to recommend each story to a different friend as being somehow meaningful to their own current life situations.

Also, Milkman by Anna Burns—the way its structured is masterful. She tells you up front where it’s going to go, but the back and forth in time and the swelling of nearly overwhelming mundane detail somehow sustains tension and creates suspense leading up to the ending. The images and emotional landscape really stuck with me.

What book made the greatest impression on you?
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Country Music: Selected Early Poems by Charles Wright

Which writers do you love (or hate) the most?
Love: Maggie Nelson, Anne Carson, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Hass, and every now and then I need to read some Margaret Atwood to feel grounded again.

When and how do you read?
I read on the subway to and from work, usually the New Yorker. During my lunch I like to take a walk to clear my mind for half the time and then read a book while I eat (apologies to my new coworkers if I appear antisocial, it’s my introvert). I read before bed every night, usually a novel. I’ll read in the evenings while my husband plays video games, and in a coffee shop on the weekends while he draws, or in bed on the weekends if I wake up before he does. I wake up early one morning a week to go to my favorite coffee shop and read poetry and some kind of writing book—that keeps me sane.

What book might people be surprised to find on your shelves?
Ha, I have eclectic interests and buy retired books from the library for a quarter with the intention to read and then donate to Free Little Library, so I have amassed an odd assortment. But Mind Hunter by John Douglas has been sitting by my bed for a long time, and I probably won’t donate it when I’m done. I started reading true crime as “research” for a PhD I thought I might try to get, but now I just need to fess up to the fact that I am among the stereotype who consume it.

Who is your favorite fictional hero or heroine?
Does Anne of Green Gables count? She was so plucky. Or Indiana Jones—the scholar adventurist.

What Temple University Press book has particular meaning to you?
2502_regWho Will Speak for America?edited by Stephanie Feldman and Nathaniel Popkin. I attended a Writers Resist event in Philadelphia in January 2017 that was part of the inspiration for this collection. At the time, I was in my last semester in grad school for an MFA in creative writing in poetry at West Virginia University. The MFA program itself was great, fully funded, and it gave me the opportunity to work at WVU Press for two years, which is how I’m now at TUP, so I’m incredibly grateful. However, the pursuit of poetry sometimes made me want to put my head on a desk for a long time. The Writers Resist event though—local writers reading their works and works of others—and the writing and art that came out in response to it, is a testament to the power of writing and creative expression in how it brings people together and offers a communal and individual forum for mourning, for rage, and for hope.

2453_regWhat Temple University Press book would you recommended to someone?
The Man-Not, by Tommy J. Curry. Actually, I have yet to read it—it’s next on my list—so if you read it, we can discuss it!

What book will you read next?
The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World. I got it for Christmas, and it’s since been sitting on the dinosaur bookshelf, time to dust it off.

What three writers would you invite to a dinner party?
I couldn’t. I would be too nervous to meet them and stressed about cooking and what to say and if they like each other and if they mind that one of my dogs just piddled with excitement. I would garden with Louise Glück and possibly discuss murder mysteries, take a walk with Rebecca Solnit, and have whiskey with Margaret Atwood.

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