Zingers and more from “unfiltered” sportswriter Stan Hochman’s posthumous book

This week in North Philly Notes, Gloria Hochman, editor of Stan Hochman Unfiltered, writes about compiling 100 of her late husband’s columns.

As I read through Stan’s 7,000 columns to come up with the 100 or so chosen for Stan Hochman Unfiltered: 50 Years of Wit and Wisdom from the Groundbreaking Sportswriter I smiled, then I cried. All the facets of Stan’s extraordinary life and interests  were reflected in his wit, his knowledge and his way with words. He was the quintessential Renaissance man who loved cool jazz and soulful singers, chilled Chardonnay and sizzling lamb ragout, Shakespeare in the round and theater with Mark Rylance. He was passionate about social justice and harmonious race relations, a society where drugs meant antibiotics, not heroin. His sometimes gruff exterior concealed a cushy niche for the well-being of children whom he believed thrived on praise and unconditional love.  His passionate love for his family-his daughter, his daughter-in-law, his granddaughter and for me—were no secret. Anyone who read his columns or heard his broadcasts knew what was in his expansive heart and on his brilliant mind.

The book features a Foreword from WIP sports host Angelo Cataldi and a message from Governor Edward G. Rendell. The chapters are arranged by sport: Baseball, Horse Racing, Boxing,  Football, Hockey,  and Basketball (pro and college), plus one entitled, “Stan’s World:  Outside the Lines,” which features popular columns on tennis and golf, restaurant reviews, helping kids with disabilities through sports and, even Elizabeth Taylor. Each section is introduced by a sports colleague—Garry Maddox, Larry Merchant, Ray Didinger, Bernie Parent, Dick Jerardi, Pat McLoone, Weatta Frazier Collins (Joe’s daughter) and Jim Lynam.

And throughout Stan Hochman Unfiltered are his many “zingers.” Here are a few of my favorites:

  • After Temple’s Jim Williams scored 30 points in a rousing win, Penn coach Jack McCloskey looked like a guy who had wrestled a case of TNT… and lost.
  • Doug Sanders swings a golf club like a man trying to kill a rattlesnake with a garden hoe.
  • George Foreman has a heart like a lion and a head like a cantaloupe.
  • Leonard Toes loves the heat in the kitchen.  Thrives on it.  Bring on the divorce attorneys. Bring on the tough-talking truck drivers.  Leonard Tose has a vocabulary that will melt their transmissions.
  • Louise’s banana cream pie is still the most fun you can have in Atlantic City with your clothes on.

In addition to his more than 50 years as a Daily News columnist, Hochman, was well-known for his stint on WIP radio as the Grand Imperial Poobah, where he would settle callers’ most pressing sports debates.

Stan Hochman Unfiltered_smStan lived with his family in Wynnewood, PA until his death in 2015. He appeared frequently on television, wrote three books, and was featured as a grumpy sportswriter in the movie Rocky V.  The book’s cover photo of Stan is taken from that film.

My favorite columns in a remarkable field: Jackie Robinson and his struggle to become the first black baseball player in the big leagues; the tragic 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, where thirteen Israelis were killed in a chilling blot on the world’s showcase for sports excellence; his graphic description of the fight of the century between Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali (and the reactions of the ‘guys and dolls’ who were privileged to see it).

There were hundreds of columns that didn’t make it into the book. They sit in a corner in my bedroom with a big label: heartbreakingly discarded. Maybe another book!

I’ve won 23 journalism awards and had a book on the New York Times bestseller list for three months. But this one is my labor of love—a tribute to the most remarkable wordsmith, husband, father, grandfather and mentor to countless friends and colleagues who continue to carry into the world what we learned from him.

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