University Press Week Blog Tour: Scientific Voices

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #RaiseUP. Today’s theme is Scientific Voices

Johns Hopkins University Press @jhupress
A post on centering women’s voices in science.

University of Alabama Press @univalpress
An interview with our NEXUS series editors.

Purdue University Press @purduepress
A post about the work being done to learn the science behind the human-animal bond.

Oregon State University Press @OSUPress
A post from author Bruce Byers about lessons for the biosphere from the Oregon Coast.

Princeton University Press @PrincetonUPress
Physical Sciences editor Ingrid Gnerlich will write about the unique challenges of Science publishing and the reality that Science thrives on a diversity of views and voices.

Bristol University Press @BrisUniPress
A blog post from Claire Wilkinson, editor of the new Contemporary Issues in Science Communication series, on the contemporary relevance of science communication in the era of COVID

Indiana University Press @iupress
An excerpt from Weird Earth: Debunking Strange Ideas About Our Planet by Donald R. Prothero.

University of Toronto Press @utpress
Mireille F. Ghoussoub, co-author of The Story of CO2: Big Ideas for a Small Molecule, will talk about the importance of university press publishing.
University of Toronto Press Journals Guest post by Lacey Cranston, managing editor of the Journal of Military Veteran and Family Health.

Vanderbilt University Press @vanderbiltup
A post about Between the Rocks and the Stars, a book that presents scientific research and observation about the natural world for a general audience, plus a new trailer for the book.

Columbia University Press @ColumbiaUP
Ashley Juavinett, author of So You Want to Be a Neuroscientist? offers practical advices to those looking to enter a career in Neuroscience.

University Press Week: Local Voices

Celebrating University Press Week, and the theme, #RaiseUP, we spotlight local voices and our Pennsylvania History series. The books in this series are designed to make high-quality scholarship accessible for students, advancing the mission of the Pennsylvania Historical Association by engaging with key social, political, and cultural issues in the history of the state and region. Series editors Beverly C. Tomek and Allen Dieterich-Ward explain more in this blog entry.

Temple University Press is a leading publisher of regional titles, helping authors of a variety of works on Philadelphia and Pennsylvania share their work with other scholars and general readers throughout the region and the world. As such, they were a natural partner for the Pennsylvania Historical Association (PHA).

The PHA has long published a number of titles, including a “History Studies” pamphlet series that began in 1948. The series was originally envisioned as an adjunct to the association’s journal, but it took on a life of its own as the earlier pamphlet-style publications gradually expanded to modest booklets. These works told the story of various ethnic groups, industries, and workers throughout the Keystone State. Books in the series also discussed Pennsylvania sports, various reform movements throughout the state’s history, and the role of women in Pennsylvania history. As they grew in variety, the booklets gained the attention of educators in classrooms and museums and were increasingly used as textbooks for courses throughout the state.

As the association neared the seventieth anniversary of the founding of the study series, the PHA rebranded it the Pennsylvania History series and decided to partner with a university press to take the booklets to the next level. They wanted the series to benefit from the expertise, resources, and support of a respected academic publisher and to produce high-quality yet inexpensive books in place of the booklets. After investigating multiple publishers, the PHA chose Temple University Press and began an exciting partnership that has seen a significant improvement in the quality of the publications.

In its initial form, the Pennsylvania History series included pamphlets that were stapled at the spine. Written by experts in the field and heavily illustrated, these pamphlets offered introductory overviews of a number of important topics in Pennsylvania history.

The second iteration of the History series included booklets that maintained the PHA’s mission. They remained short in length and continued to include a number of illustrations.

Now, published in partnership with Temple University Press, the Pennsylvania History series features professionally produced and marketed books introducing readers to key topics in the state’s history.

As part of the PHA’s mission to advocate for and advance knowledge of the history and culture of Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic region, the series remains committed to providing timely, relevant, and high-quality scholarship in a compact and accessible form. Volumes in the series are written by scholars engaged in the teaching of Pennsylvania history for use in the classroom and broader public history settings. Temple has worked with the PHA to ensure that the books remain affordable while expanding the series’ reach. Since the partnership began, the Pennsylvania History series has released an updated edition on the history of Philadelphia, a new volume on the Scots-Irish in early Pennsylvania, and the first book-length survey on the history of public health and medicine in the state.

Plans for 2021/2022 include a new history of Pennsylvania slavery and abolition by Beverly Tomek and an updated edition of Terry Madonna’s Pivotal Pennsylvania on presidential politics in the Keystone State.

University Press Week Blog Tour: Creative Voices

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #RaiseUP. Today’s theme is Creative Voices

Northwestern University Press @NorthwesternUP
A post that highlights Art Is Everything by Yxta Maya Murray

University of Notre Dame Press @UNDPress
A post about the value of university press publishing from our Notre Dame Press Colleagues.

University of Michigan Press @uofmpress
Highlighting voices in the music and performance studies spaces in new and exciting ways.

Athabasca University Press @au_press
A discussion about the importance of publishing creative work alongside scholarly monographs.

University of Toronto Press @utpress
Charlotte Corden is an illustrator and fine artist who often works in the realms of anthropology. Charlotte is the illustrator of Light in Dark Times, a new graphic novel from UTP written by Alisse Waterston. Charlotte will write about the creative process involved in creating this stunning and important new book.
University of Toronto Press Journals: Guest blogger Thalia Gonzalez Kane is an Online Features Editor for Canadian Theatre Review.

Bristol University Press @BrisUniPress
Author Rob Kitchin on research creation and creative practice in critical data studies.

Bucknell University Press @BucknellUPress
One of our most prolific authors, Kevin Cope, will share his thoughts on creative approaches to studying and writing about 18th-century literature.

UBC Press @ubcpress
A Q&A with Gerilee McBride, Catalogues and Advertising Manager, about the design behind our open-access book, It’s All Good.

University Press Week Blog Tour: New Voices

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #RaiseUP. Today’s theme is New Voices

University of Illinois Press @illinoispress
An interview with newly promoted acquisitions editor, Alison Syring

Georgetown University Press @Georgetown_UP
An interview with our newest GUP acquisitions editor, Hilary Claggett

Duke University Press @DukePress
Acquisitions and journal editors discuss why we value working with first-time authors

University of Wisconsin Press @UWiscPress
Our press committee members share their perspectives and experiences.

Wilfred Laurier University Press @wlupress
Maia Desjardins, Digital Project Coordinator, is new to publishing and also involved in some of our newer ventures like audiobooks and podcasting. She will share her experience and perspective on working at the press and on these initiatives.

University of Toronto Press @utpress
Jodi Litvin, Inside Sales Representative, is new to publishing. She will share her experience working at UTP for the last 2 months.
University of Toronto Press Journals Amanda Buessecker, new marketing coordinator for the University of Toronto Press Journals, discusses her thoughts on academic publishing.

University of Missouri Press @umissouripress
Amy Laurel Fluker is a first-time author whose blog about Kansas City’s Veteran Company A provides further insight into her recently published book, Commonwealth of Compromise: Civil War Commemoration in Missouri, on Civil War memory and the collaborative commemoration efforts undertaken in Missouri.

Bucknell University Press @BucknellUPress
Guest blogger Shanee Stepakoff, author of the forthcoming poetry collection Testimony: Found Poems from the Special Court for Sierra Leone, will share her experience working with a UP for the first time.

University of Manitoba Press @umanitobapress
An excerpt from Brittany Luby’s academic debut, Dammed: The Politics of Loss and Survival in Anishinaabe Territory.

Amherst College Press @AmCollPress
An introduction to ACP’s internship program and new community page featuring blog posts and resources created by Amherst undergrads

University Press Week Blog Tour: How to practice compassion

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is Read. Think. Act. Today’s theme is: How to practice compassion

banner.upw2019.jpg

University of Washington Press @UWAPress

University of Washington Press Publicity Manager, M’Bilia Meekers, and Interim Sales and Marketing Director, Julie Fergus will have a conversation about the intersections between compassion, emotional intelligence, and marketing university press books.

Columbia University Press @columbiaUP

A guest blog post from Elizabeth Segal, author of Social Empathy, and how social empathy can help you become a more compassionate person.

University of Illinois Press @Illinoispress

A post about our new Transformations series and related journals and how they provide a collection of work that is radically committed to postoppositional, transdisciplinary, and transformative approaches to knowledge production and social justice.

Penn State University Press @PSUPress

A post from PSU Press Editor-in-Chief about how books in our Graphic Medicine series can catalyze the practice of compassion.

University of South Carolina Press  @uscpress

Quote from authors of Southern Perspectives on the Queer Movement about the importance of support and inclusivity within a diverse queer community in the 1980s-90s in an often hostile environment of a conservative southern state

University of Nebraska Press @UnivNewPress

Excerpt on compassion from The Heart of Torah by Rabbi Shai Held.

Bucknell University Press @BucknellUPress

Guest post by Jason Farr, author of Novel Bodies: Disability and Sexuality in Eighteentgh-Century British Literature.

Beacon Press @beaconpressbks

A Q&A with Peter Jan Honigsberg, author of A Place Outside the Law: Forgotten Voices from Guantánamo and director of Witness to Guantánamo.

 

University Press Week Blog Tour: How to speak up and speak out

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is Read. Think. Act. Today’s theme is: How to speak up and speak out

banner.upw2019.jpg

University of Chicago Press  @UChicagoPress

Syracuse University Press @SUPress

Kelly Belanger, the author of Invisible Seasons: Title IX and the Fight for Equity in College Sports will discuss the theme speaking up and speaking out.

Fordham University Press @FordhamPress

A post from Joan Marans Dim, writer, historian, and co-author of Lady Liberty: An Illustrated History of America’s Most Storied Woman, focused on engaging readers to speak up and speak out.

Harvard Education Press @Harvard_Ed_Pub

Blog post by Tracey Benson, co-author of Unconscious Bias in Schools, about speaking out about racism and U.S. education.

University of South Carolina Press  @uscpress

Will Gravely, author of They Stole Him Out of Jail, will talk about how to call out racism.

University of Arizona Press @AZPress

Blog post about a book coming out that week by Mexican American Studies Associate Professor Roberto Rodriguez, inspired by his own experience with police violence when he nearly lost his life working as a journalist in Los Angeles.

University of British Columbia Press @UBCPress

An excerpt from From Where I Standby Jody Wilson-Raybould, a politician and Indigenous Canadian speaking on Indigenous Reconciliation and self-determination.

University of Nebraska Press @UnivNebPress

Guest post from Tim Hillegonds, author of The Distance Between.

Northwestern University Press 

We blog about Lee Bey’s Southern Exposure, a beautiful look at Chicago South Side architecture that also illuminates and raises awareness of the caustic effects of disinvestment in the area.

University of Toronto Press  @utpjournals

In this post, University of Toronto Press’s Journals division shares its approach to the current and future challenges of peer review and why we chose Publons to help us support the peer review community and ensure peer reviewers are publicly recognized for their work.

University of Regina Press @UofRPress

Recent publications that show resistance against power in action.

University Press Week Blog Tour: Science

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Science

banner.upweek2018

Johns Hopkins University Press @JHUPress

To Be Determined

Princeton University Press @PrincetonUPress

Our director Christie Henry will be writing about the evolution of science publishing at university presses, with a focus on how the evolution and long-term sustainability of these programs depend on the ability to create equitable and inclusive populations of authors.

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

We’ll post about Finding Einstein’s Brain by Frederick Lepore, MD.

University Press of Colorado @UPColorado

Imagination requires hope: at once a mode of survival and a form of resistance. A post from UPC author Char Miller.

Columbia University Press @ColumbiaUP

Our new acquisitions editor in the sciences, Miranda Martin, will write a guest blog post about why it’s important for University Presses to publish in the sciences and what her vision is for a list moving forward.

University Press of Toronto @utpress

We reach back to the archives of The Heritage Project at UTP to highlight some key titles from our backlist on the history of science.

University of Georgia Press @ugapress

The post will be of the latest episode of our podcast and it will feature a talk William Bryan gave recently at the Decatur Book Festival for his book The Price of Permanence: Nature and Business in the New South. Bryan’s book is in our Environmental History and the American South series and is about the efforts business leaders in the post-civil war south took to promote environmental stewardship through something they called “permanence,” which is a sort of precursor to what we think of as sustainability.

University Press Week Blog Tour: History

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is History

banner.upweek2018

Wilfrid Laurier University Press @wlupress

Nil Santiáñez, author of the recently-published Wittgenstein’s Ethics and Modern Warfare, explores how the Great War impacted Wittgenstein’s philosophy. The post celebrates the centenary of the Armistice of 1918 and focuses on the book’s main topics.

University of California Press, @ucpress

The Western Woman Voter: The Women’s Suffrage Movement, Through the Perspective of the West – an excerpt taken from ‘Shaped by the West, Volume 2: A History of North America from 1850‘ by William Deverell & Anne F. Hyde

University of Nebraska Press, @univnebpress

Jon K. Lauck, adjunct professor of history and political science at the University of South Dakota and the author of numerous books, will discuss the importance of Midwestern history.

University of Alabama Press @univofALpress

A roundup of new and forthcoming history books celebrating Alabama’s bicentennial in 2019 #AL200

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

A history/memoir by acclaimed cultural historian H. Bruce Franklin titled Crash Course: From the Good War to the Forever War. We’ll focus on his book.

University of Rochester Press @boydellbrewer

An interview with the author of our new book An Architecture of Education: African American Women Design the New South, which uncovers the role of African American women in the design and construction of schools in the post-Reconstruction South.

Beacon Press @beaconpressbks

A broad look at our ReVisioning Amerian History and ReVisioning American History for Young Readers Series.

University Press of Kansas  @Kansas_Press 

Will discuss (and celebrate!) the passion of military history readers by interviewing authors, critics and customers.

Harvard University Press  @Harvard_Press

Executive Editor Lindsay Waters looks back on HUP’s hisory of pubishing Bruno Latour.

University of Georgia Press @UGAPress

This post will be a spotlight on one of our newest series, Gender and Slavery, and its inaugural book, Sexuality and Slavery: Reclaiming Intimate Histories in the Americas. The series seeks to shed light on the gendered experience of enslavement including and beyond that of the United States. The book takes on a new approach of sexuality, including discussions of sexuality as a means of resistance, that can help inform our present day.

University of Toronto Press @utpress

Editor Stephen Shapiro reflects on the vast range and the staying power of UTP’s publishing program in history.

MIT Press @mitpress

We have a Q&A with our longtime editor Roger Conover (who is retiring next year) and one of his authors Craig Dworkin, about his history at the MIT Press.

University Press Week Blog Tour: Politics

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Politicsbanner.upweek2018

University of Chicago Press @UChicagoPress
The book world is groaning under the weight of books about politics. Yet most of them are just dressed up opinion. What university press books on politics have to offer is much better: data and serious analysis. And we have an incredible group of recent books that, taken together, offer far more insight into what’s going on with American politics than a thousand Bob Woodward or Newt Gingrich books could ever supply.

Georgetown University Press @GUPress

A Pocket Guide to the U.S. Constitution.

Teachers College Press @TCPress

A reading list on education policy or a listicle from an author on the topic.

University of Wisconsin Press @uwiscpress

To Be Determined

University of Virginia Press @uvapress

We are publishing an updated edition of our Trump book in time for second anniversary of inauguration. We will pull something from that book for a post and tie it into the just-decided midterms.

Rutgers University Press @rutgersupress

We plan to dedicate a post on three recent politics books we’ve published: The Politics of Fame by Eric Burns and the reissues of classics Democracy Ancient and Modern by M.I. Finley and Echoes of the Marseillaise by Eric Hobsbawn.

University of British Columbia Press @UBCPress 

A feature on our new Women’s Suffrage and the Struggle for Democracy series.

Louisiana State University Press @lsupress

I’m going to talk about our new list dealing with contemporary social justice issues, pegged to Jim Crow’s Last Stand and the recent state vote to ban non-unanimous criminal jury verdicts.

University Press of Kansas @Kansas_Press  

Will post interview with Dick Simpson and Betty O’Shaughnessy, authors of Winning Elections in the 21st Century.

 

 

University Press Week Blog Tour: Arts and Culture

It’s University Press Week and the Blog Tour is back! This year’s theme is #TurnItUP. Today’s theme is Arts and Culture

banner.upweek2018

MIT University Press @mitpress
Is planning a Q&A with our longtime editor Roger Conover (who is retiring next year) and one of his authors Slavoj Žižek , a philosopher and cultural critic, about his career here at the Press.

Athabasca University Press  @au_press
Discusses Frankenstein’s influence on Canadian pop culture with a focus on music. Naturally, the author had to create a mix of all the songs mentioned in the book and so we will be discussing how university presses can quite literally #TurnItUp.

Rutgers University Press @RutgersUPress
Dedicates a post to our new book Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts by Judith Brodsky and Ferris Olin

Yale University Press @yaleARTBooks
Based on the book Essential Modernism, edited by Dominic Bradbury, we’ll have a post by Dominic about how immigrants enrich a country’s art and architecture (discusses a number of artists and architects who arrived in the US at midcentury).

Duke University Press @DukePress
Features some recent collaborations with museums, sharing why these collaborations work for both of us.

University of Minnesota Press @UMinnPress
Adrienne Kennedy will be inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame on Nov. 12th. We’ll run an excerpt from The Adrienne Kennedy Reader.

University of Toronto Press @utpress
Social media specialist Tanya Rohrmoser discusses how social media can be an effective vehicle for communicating research in the arts and humanities

%d bloggers like this: