Celebrating Pride

This week in North Philly Notes, we celebrate Pride month with a dozen Temple University Press’s LGBTQ titles.

City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves: Lesbian and Gay Philadelphia, 1945-1972by Marc Stein

Marc Stein’s City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves is refreshing for at least two reasons: it centers on a city that is not generally associated with a vibrant gay and lesbian culture, and it shows that a community was forming long before the Stonewall rebellion. In this lively and well received book, Marc Stein brings to life the neighborhood bars and clubs where people gathered and the political issues that rallied the community. He reminds us that Philadelphians were leaders in the national gay and lesbian movement and, in doing so, suggests that New York and San Francisco have for too long obscured the contributions of other cities to gay culture.

Civic Intimacies: Black Queer Improvisations on Citizenshipby Niels van Doorn

Because members of the Black queer community often exist outside conventional civic institutions, they must explore alternative intimacies to experience a sense of belonging. Civic Intimacies examines how—and to what extent—these different forms of intimacy catalyze the values, aspirations, and collective flourishing of Black queer denizens of Baltimore. Niels van Doorn draws on eighteen months of immersive ethnographic fieldwork for his innovative cross-disciplinary analysis of contemporary debates in political and cultural theory.

Deregulating Desire: Flight Attendant Activism, Family Politics, and Workplace Justice, by Ryan Patrick Murphy

In 1975, National Airlines was shut down for 127 days when flight attendants went on strike to protest long hours and low pay. Activists at National and many other U.S. airlines sought to win political power and material resources for people who live beyond the boundary of the traditional family. In Deregulating Desire, Ryan Patrick Murphy, a former flight attendant himself, chronicles the efforts of single women, unmarried parents, lesbians and gay men, as well as same-sex couples to make the airline industry a crucible for social change in the decades after 1970.

From Identity to Politics: The Lesbian and Gay Movements in the United Statesby Craig A. Rimmerman

Liberal democracy has provided a certain degree of lesbian and gay rights. But those rights, as we now know, are not unlimited, and they continue to be the focus of efforts by lesbian and gay movements in the United States to promote social change. In this compelling critique, Craig Rimmerman looks at the past, present, and future of the movements to analyze whether it is possible for them to link identity concerns with a progressive coalition for political, social, and gender change, one that take into account race, class, and gender inequalities. Enriched by eight years of interviews in Washington, D.C. and New York City, and by the author’s experience as a Capitol Hill staffer, From Identity to Politics will provoke discussion in classrooms and caucus rooms across the United States.

The Hirschfeld Archives: Violence, Death, and Modern Queer Culture, by Heike Bauer

Influential sexologist and activist Magnus Hirschfeld founded Berlin’s Institute of Sexual Sciences in 1919 as a home and workplace to study homosexual rights activism and support transgender people. It was destroyed by the Nazis in 1933. This episode in history prompted Heike Bauer to ask, Is violence an intrinsic part of modern queer culture? The Hirschfeld Archives answers this critical question by examining the violence that shaped queer existence in the first part of the twentieth century.

In a Queer Voice: Journeys of Resilience from Adolescence to Adulthood, by Michael Sadowski

Adolescence is a difficult time, but it can be particularly stressful for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer-identifying youth. In order to avoid harassment and rejection, many LGBTQ teens hide their identities from their families, peers, and even themselves. Educator Michael Sadowski deftly brings the voices of LGBTQ youth out into the open in his poignant and important book, In a Queer Voice. Drawing on two waves of interviews conducted six years apart, Sadowski chronicles how queer youth, who were often “silenced” in school and elsewhere, now can approach adulthood with a strong, queer voice.

Just Queer Folks: Gender and Sexuality in Rural Americaby Colin R. Johnson

Most studies of lesbian and gay history focus on urban environments. Yet gender and sexual diversity were anything but rare in nonmetropolitan areas in the first half of the twentieth century. Just Queer Folks explores the seldom-discussed history of same-sex intimacy and gender nonconformity in rural and small-town America during a period when the now familiar concepts of heterosexuality and homosexuality were just beginning to take shape. Eschewing the notion that identity is always the best measure of what can be known about gender and sexuality, Colin R. Johnson argues instead for a queer historicist approach. In so doing, he uncovers a startlingly unruly rural past in which small-town eccentrics, “mannish” farm women, and cross-dressing Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees were often just queer folks so far as their neighbors were concerned. Written with wit and verve, Just Queer Folks upsets a whole host of contemporary commonplaces, including the notion that queer history is always urban history.

Modern American Queer Historyedited by Allida M. Black

In the twentieth century, countless Americans claimed gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender identities, forming a movement to secure social as well as political equality. This collection of essays considers the history as well as the historiography of the queer identities and struggles that developed in the United States in the midst of widespread upheaval and change.

Officially Gay: The Political Construction of Sexuality by the U.S. Militaryby Gary L. Lehring

Officially Gay follows the military’s century-long attempt to identify and exclude gays and lesbians. It traces how the military historically constructed definitions of homosexual identity relying upon religious, medical, and psychological discourses that defined homosexuals as evil, degenerate, and unstable, making their risk to national security obvious, and mandating their exclusion from the Armed Services.

Out in the Union: A Labor History of Queer Americaby Miriam Frank

Out in the Union tells the continuous story of queer American workers from the mid-1960s through 2013. Miriam Frank shrewdly chronicles the evolution of labor politics with queer activism and identity formation, showing how unions began affirming the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender workers in the 1970s and 1980s. She documents coming out on the job and in the union as well as issues of discrimination and harassment, and the creation of alliances between unions and LGBT communities.

Sticky Rice: A Politics of Intraracial Desireby Cynthia Wu

Cynthia Wu’s provocative Sticky Rice examines representations of same-sex desires and intraracial intimacies in some of the most widely read pieces of Asian American literature. Analyzing canonical works such as John Okada’s No-No Boy, Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt, H. T. Tsiang’s And China Has Hands, and Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s Blu’s Hanging, as well as Philip Kan Gotanda’s play, Yankee Dawg You Die, Wu considers how male relationships in these texts blur the boundaries among the homosocial, the homoerotic, and the homosexual in ways that lie beyond our concepts of modern gay identity.

Vulnerable Constitutions: Queerness, Disability, and the Remaking of American Manhood, by Cynthia Barounis

Amputation need not always signify castration; indeed, in Jack London’s fiction, losing a limb becomes part of a process through which queerly gendered men become properly masculinized. In her astute book, Vulnerable Constitutions, Cynthia Barounis explores the way American writers have fashioned alternative—even resistant—epistemologies of queerness, disability, and masculinity. She seeks to understand the way perverse sexuality, physical damage, and bodily contamination have stimulated—rather than created a crisis for—masculine characters in twentieth- and early twenty-first-century literature.

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Celebrating Juneteenth

This week in North Philly Notes, we celebrate Juneteenth with a focus on Envisioning Emancipation by Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer.

The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the most important documents in American history. As we commemorate its 150th anniversary, what do we really know about those who experienced slavery?

In their pioneering book, Envisioning Emancipation, renowned photographic historian Deborah Willis and historian of slavery Barbara Krauthamer have amassed 150 photographs—some never before published—from the antebellum days of the 1850s through the New Deal era of the 1930s. The authors vividly display the seismic impact of emancipation on African Americans born before and after the Proclamation, providing a perspective on freedom and slavery and a way to understand the photos as documents of engagement, action, struggle, and aspiration.

Envisioning Emancipation illustrates what freedom looked like for black Americans in the Civil War era. From photos of the enslaved on plantations and African American soldiers and camp workers in the Union Army to Juneteenth celebrations, slave reunions, and portraits of black families and workers in the American South, the images in this book challenge perceptions of slavery. They show not only what the subjects emphasized about themselves but also the ways Americans of all colors and genders opposed slavery and marked its end.

Filled with powerful images of lives too often ignored or erased from historical records, Envisioning Emancipation provides a new perspective on American culture.

And check out all of Temple University Press’s African American Studies titles. 

Meet the Press

This week in North Philly Notes, we participate in an AAUP Blog Tour where we celebrate the staff of Temple University Press: Who we are, what we do, what we read, and what we love.

Temple University Press began publishing 50 years ago with books about urban studies, labor studies, as well as women’s studies, ethnic studies. We’ve since grown to include books on Asian American, Latina/o and African American studies as well as gender and sexuality, law and criminology, animal rights, sports, and regional studies. Our titles showcase our proud commitment to social sciences and the humanities.

But Temple University Press is more than just the books we publish. It’s about the people at the press and the knowledge, skills, and talent they bring to help our authors’ words and ideas into print.

To show that the Press is more than just a sum of its parts, we focus this blog on the people at the Press and what they are passion about.

Gendered Executive_smMary Rose Muccie, Director, has worked in publishing for over 30 years. Thanks to over a dozen summers working on the Wildwood, NJ boardwalk, Mary Rose counts among her skills the ability to make a perfect soft-serve ice cream cone and dip it in chocolate. A lifelong Philadelphia sports fan, she has high hopes that the Flyers will win another Stanley Cup in her lifetime. She finds inspiration and hope in the Press’s titles on women and politics, such as Navigating Gendered Terrain and The Gendered Executive.

Aaron Javsicas, Editor-in-Chief, has worked in academic book publishing for 19 years, including almost six at Temple. Aaron pays far too much attention to politics for his own good, though it may benefit his political science list. He’s a fan of cooking, Philadelphia, the films Dr. Strangelove and Flash Gordon (the one with the Queen soundtrack), and he takes any opportunity to get outdoors with his two sons and his wife, Lucinda.

swingin at the savoyLike the Duke Ellington book title “Music Is My Mistress,” Marketing Director Ann-Marie Anderson rocks when the Press has music and dance titles on the list. From saxophonist Jimmy Heath and composer Benny Golson to swing dancers Norma Miller and Frankie Manning, she’s a closeted jazz vocalist who lives vicariously through their stories. And on the side Ann-Marie loves marketing books, all books, well sorta.

Karen Baker, Associate Director and Financial Manager, doesn’t manage the press like she’s scheming for power on Game of Thrones, but that’s because she’s a softie for animals and the press’s list in Animal and SocietyIf You Tame Me in particular. Karen is also the queen of the gif.

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Gary Kramer, Publicity Manager, has honed his media experience since he started working at the press 20 years ago. The development of social media has been particularly exciting to embrace. He also manages the press blog. An avid reader, he has a special appreciation for the Press’s cinema studies, Latin American studies, and sexuality studies lists. A foodie and professional film critic, he is quick with a restaurant or movie recommendation, too.

Irene Imperio, Advertising and Promotions Manager, started at the Press as a student and advanced her way up to being the Press database master and a master crafter. Among her many talents, Irene made a Rocky statue cutout for the recent Organization of American Historians conference here in Philadelphia to promote a book about Philadelphia public artworks, Contested Image.

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Dave Wilson, Senior Production Editor, loves his book projects almost as much as he loves his three cats. He truly enjoys reading and working on the Press’s regional titles and working with various book printers.

Joan Vidal, Production Editor, manages in-house book projects and oversees TUP’s pool of freelance copyeditors. She enjoys international folk dancing and holds a special place in her heart for the TUP title Klezmer, by Hankus Netsky. A firm believer in the morale-boosting power of sweets, she helps stock TUP’s communal snack area and keeps track of staff birthdays so everyone has cake!

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Kate Nichols, Art Manager, enjoys designing the covers and interiors of Temple University Press books. But she especially enjoys working on the press’s journal, Kalfou, When she is not at the press, she can be found tending her garden or walking her dogs.

Sarah Munroe, Editor and devoted dinosaur lover, acquires all things humanities and is pumped to herald Quynh Nhu Le’s Unsettled Solidarities, the first book in the new Critical Race, Indigeneity, and Relationality series. Her personal bookshelves reflect her expansive curiosity and background in poetry, and she likes to balance the more literary and deep-thinking endeavors with true crime and crime fiction. Years down the road she may leave publishing to become a paleontologist or a forensic geographer.

Ryan Mulligan, Acquisitions Editor, acquires the Press’s titles in sociology and criminology. He also acquires Temple’s sports books, so he is always eager to get his colleagues excited about sports, including running the Press’s interoffice March Madness bracket contest, to the bemusement of his colleagues. One of Ryan’s proudest moments in the office was suggesting the copy for the Press’s first billboard ad, a promotion for Boathouse Row that ran alongside the perpetually traffic jammed Schuykill Expressway near the iconic riverside landmark, reading “You’d Get There Faster By Rowing.”

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Ashley Petrucci, Editorial Assistant and Rights and Contracts Coordinator, assists acquisitions editors, creates book contracts, and reviews permissions for Temple University Press. She likes people, places, and things (credit: April Ludgate, Parks and Recreation, 2009 / permission form from NBC incoming), along with the Press’s more ghostly titles, like The Supernatural in Society, Culture, and History.  She is the Press’s resource on all things Gen Z—despite actually being a Millennial—and is always up to date on the latest memes.

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“I’ll take film for $1000, Alex”

We’ve taken control of North Philly Notes to celebrate its illustrious creator and owner.

His twitter handle is “I’m a twin and a film critic who always has a book in his hand. I also have an opinion, and I’m not afraid to share it.“ That pretty much sums up Temple University Press’s publicity manager Gary Kramer. Gary has worked at the Press for almost 20 years and before that he had a brief stint at Princeton U. Press. At Temple, he’s responsible for the preparation of copy for book jackets, catalogs, and press releases as well as securing advance promotional statements from various academics. He plans and coordinates publicity activities for all Press books and participates in the development of marketing strategies. He compiles and produces a weekly update e-mail titled “News of the Week,” which informs our mailing list subscribers of the authors in the news, appearances, reviews published that week, and any new blog entries on our North Philly Notes blog site. He’s incredibly hard-working, smart, and engaging with amazing skills and abilities. He is also witty and imaginative. He responds to emails with lightning speed, and maintains such good relations with authors that oftentimes authors write him before they even approach their acquisitions editor.

GarywithBookBut Gary has much more going on beyond his work at the Press. He’s the author of Independent Queer Cinema: Reviews and Interviews and co-author of Directory of World Cinema: Argentina. He’s also a film critic whose blurbs often adorn movie ads in the pages of the New York Times. Ask him any question about a film and he knows the answer; if you don’t know the name of the film just give him one actor’s name and a one sentence description of the film and he’ll name the film.

Gary exemplifies everything we love about university press publishing.  He gives his all to the Press and our authors, he’s a published author, and his film reviews are read by moviegoers worldwide.

Jeopardy anyone?

Announcing the new issue of Kalfou

This week in North Philly Notes, we present the table of contents for the new issue of Temple University Press’s journal, Kalfou, edited by George Lipsitz.

Please recommend to your library!   • To subscribe: click here  

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Vol 6 No 1 (2019): Kalfou: A Journal of Comparative and Relational Ethnic Studies
Feature Articles

Art and Social Action

Teaching and Truth

In Memoriam

Book Reviews

Kalfou is a scholarly journal focused on social movements, social institutions, and social relations. We seek to build links among intellectuals, artists, and activists in shared struggles for social justice. The journal seeks to promote the development of community-based scholarship in ethnic studies among humanists and social scientists and to connect the specialized knowledge produced in academe to the situated knowledge generated in aggrieved communities.

Kalfou is published by Temple University Press on behalf of the UCSB Center for Black Studies Research.

 

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